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AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka explains why CEO Andrew Puzder, President Trump's nominee to be Secretary of Labor, is a bad choice for the office and will not be the advocate working people

Donald Trump will soon decide whether or not to repeal a number of pro-worker regulations that make a real difference in the lives of working people.

As this election made clear, a lot of Americans are angry. They feel left behind by the economy, and isolated and unheard in our democracy. Some of this frustration is understandable—wages have hardly budged in decades, inequality is near record levels, and money dominates our political system (and those who don’t have much of it are usually ignored by politicians). That’s a recipe for frustration and alienation, and President-elect Donald Trump seized on it.

On Thursday, Nov. 10, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) addressed the AFL-CIO Executive Council regarding the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka released the following statement on the results of the 2016 presidential election:

Donald Trump has been elected president. America is a democratic nation, and the voters have spoken.

The AFL-CIO accepts the outcome of this election and offers our congratulations to President-elect Trump.

More than anything, this election is an indictment of politics as usual.

The National Labor Relations Board, the agency charged with enforcing federal labor law, ruled Thursday that the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas violated the National Labor Relations Act by refusing to bargain with a union that represents more than 500 housekeeping, food and beverage and guest services workers there.

Benjamin Watson is a tight end for the NFL's Baltimore Ravens. And he's also a concerned citizen who not only participates in the political process, but he wants you to do the same. As Watson says, "Don't stay home and let someone else decide our future without you having a say."

Watch the video and then do your part.

Sheet metal worker and 9/11 first responder Joe Rabito takes 14 medications a day so he can breathe. Joe was one of the tens of thousands of first responders in New York City who went out to help survivors of the World Trade Center attacks.

These people, many of them union members, are still feeling the physical and mental long-term health effects from the work they did as first responders. 

This is why the Zadroga Act, which provides permanent health care and compensation to 9/11 survivors and first responders, is so important. 

LaDonna and Mike made Oreos for Nabisco until greedy CEOs chose profits over people and sent their jobs to Mexico. They talk about friendship, solidarity in the face of job-loss, and who they think will work tirelessly to save American jobs.

THE CT AFL-CIO HAS ENDORSED A NUMBER OF WORKER-FRIENDLY CANDIDATES FOR FEDERAL AND STATE OFFICES.