Greater Hartford Central Labor Coalition

The Donald Trump Labor Department is proposing a rule change that would mean that restaurant servers and bartenders could lose a large portion of their earnings.

Take Action

Moment of Silence

Remembering Echol Cole and Robert Walker

On February 1, 1968, Memphis sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker huddled in the back of their truck to seek shelter from a storm. Suddenly, the truck’s compactor malfunctioned, trapping Cole and Walker and crushing them to death.

The tragedy triggered the strike of the city’s 1,300 sanitation workers. They had warned the city about dangerous equipment but were ignored. They were fed up with poverty wages and racial discrimination. They walked off the job and marched under the banner: I AM A MAN. On February 1, 2018, the 50th anniversary of the accident that killed Cole and Walker, we will observe a moment of silence to honor their memory and sacrifice, as we pick up the mantle from the 1968 strikers in the ongoing fight for racial and economic justice.

We ask you to please join us on Thursday, Feb. 1, at 1 p.m. Eastern, for a national minute of reflection.

Find or host a local event, or join us for our Facebook Live event on February 1.

Dear Hartford CLC, friends, & allies,

Our friends from UFCW 371 have their NLRB election scheduled at Severance Foods in Hartford on Feb. 1st and we in the Greater Hartford Central Labor Coalition have been asked by the workers and organizers Iris Rushford & Ross Hart to participate in a solidarity rally the day before, on Jan. 31 starting at 3:30pm, to encourage the workers to vote in favor of unionization, and to welcome them into our labor family!

Please attend if you are able and please share this information far and wide so we can have a strong showing for our new sisters and brothers!

Severance Foods
3478 Main Street
Hartford, CT 06120

NOTE: If possible, please wear yellow to the rally for UFCW 371.

Recent News

Last week the German metalworkers’ union, IG Metall, arguably one of the world’s most powerful unions, showed that unions have the power to shape their future workplaces.  

IG Metall negotiated a precedent-setting collective-bargaining agreement that privileges working conditions over wages. It won its key demand that workers have the right to reduce their working week from 35 to 28 hours for a period of up to two years in order to care for family members.

Organized labor finally got its chance to be heard in the debate about how Connecticut can do a better job competing for business and improving its crisis-prone state finances.

President Trump's chief trade official Monday offered a modicum of optimism about the ongoing talks to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement, even as he shot down two key Canadian proposals and blasted a recent trade action by Canada as a "massive attack on all of our trade laws."

Last week, the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics released its annual report on union membership, which found that the number of union members rose by 260,000 in 2017. This reflects critical organizing victories across a range of industries, which have reaped higher wages, better benefits and a more secure future for working people around the country.

Of the report, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said: